Clarke Canyon Dam Beaverhead River
Beaverhead River Montana
Copyright 2016 James Marsh
Free Shipping Continental U. S.
Fly Fishing On The Beaverhead River In
Montana
The Beaverhead River Tailwater starts at the Clarke
Canyon Dam. It's considered one of, if not the best
brown trout fisheries in Montana. It also holds a good
population of rainbow trout. The brown trout average
around 18 inches in this relatively small stream. Fly
fishing the Beaverhead River can produce some trophy
size trout. The Beaverhead River flows for over 50 miles
to joins the Big Hole River at Twin Bridges, Montana to
form the Jefferson River.

Thanks to the bottom release dam, the water stays cool
all season long within a few miles of the Clark Canyon
Reservoir.  There are Special Regulations, so you want
to make sure you check on them current regulations
prior to fishing the Beaverhead.  

The river can be broken down into two main sections.
The upper part from the Clarke Canyon Dam to Barretts
Diversion Dam, a distance of about sixteen miles and
the section below Barretts. The upper section stays the
coldest during the warmer months of the year. This
section has plenty of rainbows along with the big brown
trout thanks to the lower water temperatures.

The Beaverhead River is small. It is narrow and winds
through a series of bends. Getting a large drift boat
through it isn't as easy as navigating most tailwaters.
That said, fishing the river from a drift boat is by far the
most popular way to fish. Wading is difficult in the upper
section due to the depth of the water. Bank fishing is
extremely limited. The banks are solidly lined with willow
trees and cottonwood trees. Casting without getting
hung up occasionally isn't easy.  The same is true of
nymph fishing. A heavy growth of aquatic vegetation and
weeds makes nymph fishing tough in places.

The section below Barretts Dam is different. It is much
shallower and can usually be easily waded. The flows
are reduced because of the diversion of the river's water
for agricultural use.

Springs help the quality of the water of the Beaverhead
River. The higher than normal pH of the water, supports
lots of aquatic insects. As mentioned above, the water
downstream of Barretts Dam can get a little on the warm
side. There are more brown trout and less rainbows in
the lower section of the Beaverhead River.

State Route #15 follows the upper section of the river
from Clark Canyon Dam past Barretts Diversion Dam
and all the way to the town of Dillon. Below Dillon the
Beaverhead is less productive. There are some trout but
not comparable to the upper sections of the river. It is
followed to the rivers confluence with the Big Hole by
State Route #41.
Type of Stream
Tailwater

Species
Rainbow Trout
Brown Trout
(Wild)
Mountain Whitefish (Native)

Location
Southwestern Montana

Size:
Small - 75 Miles Long

Nearest Towns
Dillion

Season:
3rd Sat May - Nov. 30th (Some
Catch and Release year-round)

Special Regulations

Access:
Good

Non-Resident License
State of Montana

Weather
National Weather Service Link

Fly Fishing Gear and Trout Flies

Stream Flow Data:
USGS Real Time Data (Barratt Dam)
USGS Real Time Data (Dillion)
Beaverhead
River Montana
100% Satisfaction Guaranteed
The most productive methods of fishing are
usually subsurface. Dry fly fishing is good at
times but limited. As our Hatches and Fly
section of the site will tell you, there are hatches
of Blue-winged Olives, Pale Morning Duns,
several species of caddisflies, and even a few
stoneflies. We found a huge population of
midges in the Beaverhead. Imitations of midges
work great year-round.

Flows from the dam are usually low during the
Winter and Spring. They fill the reservoir up so
there's plenty of water available for irrigating the
crops during the Summer. During the Summer
months, large amounts of water are diverted by
Barretts Dam for irrigation. By large amounts,
we mean as much as half of the water.
Seasons:
See the special regulations for fly fishing the
Beaverhead River.
Winter:
The water below the dam stays about the
same temperature all year and trout can be
caught during the cold winter.
Spring:
The water levels can be very high during
May and early June. If the water levels are
good, the fishing is usually good.
Continued:
The ideal stream flow rates for floating
the Beaverhead River are between 500
and a 1000 cfs. This makes it difficult to
wade the upper part. The ideal flows for
wading are 300 cfs or less. These rates
of flow are common during the winter
months. Fall flow rates can be very low.
The highest flows are usually during May
and June. August flows are usually much
better. Of course, much of this is subject
to the amount of precipitation and the
snowpack.
Fly Fishing Guide For The Beaverhead
River:
The Beaverhead River has several points that
it can be accessed and fished from the bank
or waded, but most anglers prefer to drift the
river by boat. As we have said, in the upper
part of the stream above Barrett's Dam, the
river is fairly deep with little wading
opportunities. Fishing it from a drift boat is
most always preferred to wading. The part
below Barrett's Dam down to Dillion, a distance
of about 16 miles, can be waded or fished
from a drift boat. It can get rather low during
the summer and early fall season, so you must
check the water levels. The section below
Dillion probably has fewer fish but those that
are there are usually very large. The stream
can usually be easily waded in this section.
Everything depends on the streams flows and
water levels, so be certain you check them
anytime you fish the Beaverhead River.

The stream is not the easiest stream you can
find to fish. Its large brown trout, large amount
of fishing pressure at certain times of the year,
changing water conditions, small flies that are
often required and precise presentations,
make it difficult at times to catch trout. When
you do, you are usually well rewarded with
some large trout.  

Most anglers prefer to use nymphs or
streamers. Trout can be taken at times on dry
flies but most often, nymphs and streamers will
work much better. Streamers are particularly
important during the fall when the brown trout
spawn.
Guide, continued:
They become very aggressive and will hit
most streamers if they get near them.

In the upper section, most anglers try to
drift a nymph tight against the banks
underneath the overhanging willow and
cottonwood trees. Hangups are common.
Getting the fly caught in the trees is a
common problem. Each time this occurs
on a drift boat trip, lots of time is wasted,
however, if you don't get the fly to where
the fish are holding, you will be wasting a
lot of time.

If you do fish dry flies, the best time to do
it is during a hatch, of course. That will
increase your odds of success
considerably. Fishing early and late in the
day will also help improve your odds of
catching them on attractor flies. If the sun
is bright, the rainbows will sometimes
respond to dry flies in the faster moving
current, but usually the brown are holding
deep and will not take a fly on the
surface. Your odds will increase if you fish
the dry fly on cloudy, overcast days.
Beaverhead River Hatches and Trout
Flies:
Our information on aquatic insects is based on
our stream samples of larvae and nymphs, not
guess work. We base fly suggestions on
imitating the most plentiful and most available
insects and other foods at the particular time
you are fishing. Unlike the generic fly shop
trout flies, we have specific imitations of all the
insects in the Big Hole River and in all stages
of life that are applicable to fishing. If you want
to fish better, more realistic trout flies, have a
much higher degree of success, give us a
call.  We not only will help you with selections,
you will learn why, after trying Perfect Flies,
92% of the thousands of our customers will
use nothing else.
1-800-594-4726.

The Beaverhead River has spring influence
which lowers the pH of the stream and helps
account for the huge aquatic insect population
the stream has.

Midges are not fished that much by the locals,
but work just as well on the Beaverhead as
any other tailwater. They can be very
important during the times nothing else is
hatching. Imitations of the larvae, pupae and
of the adults should be in your fly box.

As with most any other trout stream,
Blue-winged Olives are one of, if not the most
important mayfly on the Beaverhead River.
The can start hatching in March and last
through June. They will hatch again from about
the first of September into November.

PMDs, or Pale Morning Duns, hatch from
about the middle of June until the middle of
July. They represent one of the better hatches
on the river. Trico mayflies can hatch from
about the middle of July all the way through
the month of September.

Craneflies are considered very important on
the Beaverhead River. They are around for
much of the year but most available during the
late summer.

Skwala Stoneflies start hatching in the middle
of March and on into the month of April. LIttle
Brown Stoneflies also hatch in March and on
into April. Golden Stoneflies hatch in June, but
not in large quantities.
Hatches, continued:
Little Yellow Stoneflies, called Yellow
Sallies, are probably the most plentiful
stoneflies. They hatch from about the first
of June and on into the first of August.

Grannom, or Brachycentrus Caddisflies
hatch during the month of May. This
hatch, normally called the Mother's Day
hatch, can produce some good fish.
Glossoma Caddisflies, or LIttle
Short-horned Sedges, hatch in June and
July.

Spotted Sedges is probably the most
important caddisfly hatch. It starts about
the first of June and can last through the
month of August. Green Sedges start
hatching about the first of July and last
through the month of September. The
larva stage of life of this caddisfly is called
the Green Rock Worm. They can be
effective most anytime of the year.
October Caddis hatch in September and
October, but the hatch is not considered a
major event.

The terrestrial are important, especially
the ants and beetles. Imitations of grass
hopper will also catch fish, but we think
the ants and beetles are eaten more by
the trout. Anytime from around the first of
July through the month of September, you
should consider fishing them.

Streamers are very important flies. The
large browns just don't rise to dry flies
very often. Streamers work great to take
the big ones. The river has a lot of
baitfish, sculpin and plenty of crayfish in it.
You should use streamers that imitate
them.

As always, we recommend our "Perfect
Flies". They are not only the most realistic
flies you can purchase, they are the most
effective flies you can use. We have
imitations of everything that live in the
Beaverhead River, so if you haven't
already done so, please give them a try.
Summer:
Summertime is the most popular time to
fish the river.
Fall:
The water levels are normally at their
lowest during the fall. Fishing can be
excellent during this time.
Beaverhead River
Fly Fishing Beaverhead River
beaverhead river
Fishing Beaverhead River
Thumbnails: Click to enlarge
Options For Selecting Flies:
1. Email us (sales@perfectflystore.com)
with the dates you will be fishing this
stream and we will send you a list of our
fly suggestions. Please allow up to 24
hours for a response.

2. Call us 800-594-4726 and we will help
you decide which flies you need.

3. Email us (sales@perfectflystore.com)
with a budget for flies and we will select
them to match the budget and get them to
you in time for your fly fishing trip.

All orders are shipped free in the
U. S. Orders over $50 are shipped via
Priority Mail.  
Headlines: The weather is cold
and very few anglers are fishing but
the upper section of the tailwater is
full of hungry trout willing to take
your fly. Midges and Blue-winged
olives are hatching, especially on
the overcast days which should be
plentiful this coming week. The
Brown and White Belly sculpin
should still be a good fly for the
larger trout.
For the latest
information, click the Beaverhead
River fishing report linked above.
Thumbnails: Click to enlarge
10/13/15 All of the conditions are in great shape. Low water levels, hatching Blue-winded olives
and spawning brown trout. What more could you ask for. Parts of the river can be waded. It is
midges, little BWOs, Spotted Sedges and Green Caddis. There are lots of blood midges, or red
ones present. In low light and higher water conditions, Sculpin streamers are working.

10/20/15 Now is a great time to be fly fishing the Beaverhead tailwater, yet few anglers are
fishing. Brown trout are in the pre-spawn stage and very territorial and aggressive. They are
taking streamers like our Perfect Fly Brown and White Belly sculpin very well. Blue-winged
Olives are starting to hatch good and bring some fish to the surface.

10/27/15 Good conditions exist right now if you like going slow. The water is real low. It won't
stay that way for very long. There is rain coming at the end of the week..Several big brown
trout have been caught lately. They are in the pre-spawn stage and taking streamers like out
Brown Sculpin fly very well. Blue-winged Olives are also hatching good.

11/03/15 The cold weather is finally arrived. The water temperature will be dropping fast. Brown
sculpin are still catching some very big brown trout. Blue-winged olives will be hatching along
with midges but that's about it. Stream levels are just fine but keep an eye on them.  

11/10/15 Conditions have been excellent the past week. Two good reports came in from
customers fishing from their little pontoon type drift boats. They caught two browns over 18
inches, both on the Brown Sculpin streamer. Most of the browns are in the post-spawn stage
and hungry.

11/16/16 It has finally turned cold on the Beaverhead River. Highs just above freezing and lows
in the teens with lots of snow will be the norm. It will be clear this weekend. Those brave anglers
can still catch some trout even though their guides will probably freeze up. Midges would be the
way to go for sure.

11/24/15 We didn't receive any reports from anyone fishing this past week. There has been
some recent heavy snowfall and I guess that is the reason. Otherwise, conditions hasn't been
that bad. The water near the dam stays close to the same temperature throughout the winter.
The Brown Sculpin should still get you some big post-spawn brown trout.

12/02/15 The weather is going to be much better this week than the last one. Expect clear
skies and no rain or snow. Midges will be tihe only insect you need to imitate. There could be a
BWO hatch but it is doubtful. The Brown sculpin streamer should continue to work fine,
especially on the post-spawn brown trout.

12/08/15 Notice that we added Winter Stoneflies to the list of flies but they are not any and
everywhere. Look for hatches to occur in the fast water sections of the river. Midges will
continue to be the most important insects to imitate. Don't overlook the fact the Brown Sculpin
streamer fly has been catching some very large brown trout.

12/15/15 It is much colder than it has been but it affects the upper part of the Beaverhead
tailwater below the dam very little. The further downstream you fish, the colder the water will be
as most of you know. Midges and Winter stoneflies are the only insects you need to be
imitating. The weather will be much better this coming weekend.

12/22/15 I know this reads like a repeated outlook but the only change is the weather has got
even colder. It is that time of the season. It is now wintertime and midges are kings. There are
some winter stoneflies in the fast water sections with riffles. The water temperature is fine. The
air is cold and the trout could care less.

12/29/15 Fish near the dam, or at least within two or three miles. The water will be a couple
degrees warmer. Discharges should be low but fine for drift boats for the next week, but check
them. Blood, or red, miidges and Winter stonefly nymphs should work best. The White Belly
and Brown sculpin have produced the largest trout. Be sure you dress right and you will be fine.

01/05/16 The Beaverhead is a good wintertime fly fishing destination for Montana. The bottom
discharge for Clark Canyon Reservoir stays about the same temperature all winter long. At the
dam, the water is usually about 39 degrees at the lowest. Midges, fished in tandem, with the
pupa the top fly and larva the bottom, is the best fly selection at this time.

01/12/16 We recommend fishing as close to the dam as practical. This may mean putting in at
the dam and taking out the first downstream launch and repeating it. Midges and Winter
stonefly nymphs are the main flies you need. Streamers like our White Belly sculpin work good
when the skies are overcast and that should be most of the time.

01/19/16 Conditions are about the same as they were last week. As long as you fish near the
dam, you have a very good chance of catching trout. The water is warmer coming from the
bottom of Clark Canyon reservoir. Midges, fished in tandem with the larva the bottom fly and
the pupa the top fly, is the best setup. Winter stonefly nymphs are also good flies to use.

01/26/16 The stream levels should be okay but be sure and check the discharge schedule.
There is some rain and snow in the forecast just about every day for the next week. Midges,
winter stonefly nymphs and Sculpin streamers are the flies you need to be using. Fish near the
dam for the warmest water.

02/02/16 Continued, normal cold winter weather is in store of the Beaverhead. Because it is a
bottom discharge tailwater, the water comes out of the turbines at near 38 degrees. You don't
have to go far downstream before it begins to get some slush ice in the water. Fish as near the
dam as legal using midges and winter stoneflies.

02/09/16 At least the weather is going to be a little better this coming week, with highs in the
forties. It will change the water very little is any. Fish near the dam with cream or red midge
larva and pupa imitations in tandem. Midges are hatching and it is possible to catch trout on
the surface feeding on the adults. This should be a good destination this coming week.

02/16/16 Most of the time the flows are low and conditions for drifting the Beaverhead in a
small pontoon or drift boat is good throughout the cold months of the year. Midges are always
the preferred food when the water temperature is below the low forties. Creams, reds and
soon, light green midges will be going strong.

02/23/16 The weather is much warmer and that makes it more comfortable on anglers fishing
but has little effect on the water temperature. It has melted a lot of snow and ice and that keeps
the water cold. MIdges, winter stoneflies and Sculpin are the foods you should be imitating.
There could be a BWO hatch on warm days.

03/01/16 There is a week of good weather ahead with mild temperatures and less snow and
rain. The discharges have been low and the few anglers fishing have been catching trout. The
section just below the dam is best. Midges and Winter stoneflies are the insects to imitate.

03/08/16 The USGS gauge below Barrett is working again and the discharges and stream
levels are below normal for this time of the year. There is a lot of rain in the forecast this
coming week and that may eventually affect the discharges and levels, so be sure to check
them. Blood midge (red) and cream midges are the most important insects to imitate.

03/15/16
10/13/15 All of the conditions are in great shape. Low water levels, hatching Blue-winded olives
and spawning brown trout. What more could you ask for. Parts of the river can be waded. It is
midges, little BWOs, Spotted Sedges and Green Caddis. There are lots of blood midges, or red
ones present. In low light and higher water conditions, Sculpin streamers are working.

10/20/15 Now is a great time to be fly fishing the Beaverhead tailwater, yet few anglers are
fishing. Brown trout are in the pre-spawn stage and very territorial and aggressive. They are
taking streamers like our Perfect Fly Brown and White Belly sculpin very well. Blue-winged
Olives are starting to hatch good and bring some fish to the surface.

10/27/15 Good conditions exist right now if you like going slow. The water is real low. It won't
stay that way for very long. There is rain coming at the end of the week..Several big brown
trout have been caught lately. They are in the pre-spawn stage and taking streamers like out
Brown Sculpin fly very well. Blue-winged Olives are also hatching good.

11/03/15 The cold weather is finally arrived. The water temperature will be dropping fast. Brown
sculpin are still catching some very big brown trout. Blue-winged olives will be hatching along
with midges but that's about it. Stream levels are just fine but keep an eye on them.  

11/10/15 Conditions have been excellent the past week. Two good reports came in from
customers fishing from their little pontoon type drift boats. They caught two browns over 18
inches, both on the Brown Sculpin streamer. Most of the browns are in the post-spawn stage
and hungry.

11/16/16 It has finally turned cold on the Beaverhead River. Highs just above freezing and lows
in the teens with lots of snow will be the norm. It will be clear this weekend. Those brave anglers
can still catch some trout even though their guides will probably freeze up. Midges would be the
way to go for sure.

11/24/15 We didn't receive any reports from anyone fishing this past week. There has been
some recent heavy snowfall and I guess that is the reason. Otherwise, conditions hasn't been
that bad. The water near the dam stays close to the same temperature throughout the winter.
The Brown Sculpin should still get you some big post-spawn brown trout.

12/02/15 The weather is going to be much better this week than the last one. Expect clear
skies and no rain or snow. Midges will be tihe only insect you need to imitate. There could be a
BWO hatch but it is doubtful. The Brown sculpin streamer should continue to work fine,
especially on the post-spawn brown trout.

12/08/15 Notice that we added Winter Stoneflies to the list of flies but they are not any and
everywhere. Look for hatches to occur in the fast water sections of the river. Midges will
continue to be the most important insects to imitate. Don't overlook the fact the Brown Sculpin
streamer fly has been catching some very large brown trout.

12/15/15 It is much colder than it has been but it affects the upper part of the Beaverhead
tailwater below the dam very little. The further downstream you fish, the colder the water will be
as most of you know. Midges and Winter stoneflies are the only insects you need to be
imitating. The weather will be much better this coming weekend.

12/22/15 I know this reads like a repeated outlook but the only change is the weather has got
even colder. It is that time of the season. It is now wintertime and midges are kings. There are
some winter stoneflies in the fast water sections with riffles. The water temperature is fine. The
air is cold and the trout could care less.

12/29/15 Fish near the dam, or at least within two or three miles. The water will be a couple
degrees warmer. Discharges should be low but fine for drift boats for the next week, but check
them. Blood, or red, miidges and Winter stonefly nymphs should work best. The White Belly
and Brown sculpin have produced the largest trout. Be sure you dress right and you will be fine.

01/05/16 The Beaverhead is a good wintertime fly fishing destination for Montana. The bottom
discharge for Clark Canyon Reservoir stays about the same temperature all winter long. At the
dam, the water is usually about 39 degrees at the lowest. Midges, fished in tandem, with the
pupa the top fly and larva the bottom, is the best fly selection at this time.

01/12/16 We recommend fishing as close to the dam as practical. This may mean putting in at
the dam and taking out the first downstream launch and repeating it. Midges and Winter
stonefly nymphs are the main flies you need. Streamers like our White Belly sculpin work good
when the skies are overcast and that should be most of the time.

01/19/16 Conditions are about the same as they were last week. As long as you fish near the
dam, you have a very good chance of catching trout. The water is warmer coming from the
bottom of Clark Canyon reservoir. Midges, fished in tandem with the larva the bottom fly and
the pupa the top fly, is the best setup. Winter stonefly nymphs are also good flies to use.

01/26/16 The stream levels should be okay but be sure and check the discharge schedule.
There is some rain and snow in the forecast just about every day for the next week. Midges,
winter stonefly nymphs and Sculpin streamers are the flies you need to be using. Fish near the
dam for the warmest water.

02/02/16 Continued, normal cold winter weather is in store of the Beaverhead. Because it is a
bottom discharge tailwater, the water comes out of the turbines at near 38 degrees. You don't
have to go far downstream before it begins to get some slush ice in the water. Fish as near the
dam as legal using midges and winter stoneflies.

02/09/16 At least the weather is going to be a little better this coming week, with highs in the
forties. It will change the water very little is any. Fish near the dam with cream or red midge
larva and pupa imitations in tandem. Midges are hatching and it is possible to catch trout on
the surface feeding on the adults. This should be a good destination this coming week.

02/16/16 Most of the time the flows are low and conditions for drifting the Beaverhead in a
small pontoon or drift boat is good throughout the cold months of the year. Midges are always
the preferred food when the water temperature is below the low forties. Creams, reds and
soon, light green midges will be going strong.

02/23/16 The weather is much warmer and that makes it more comfortable on anglers fishing
but has little effect on the water temperature. It has melted a lot of snow and ice and that keeps
the water cold. MIdges, winter stoneflies and Sculpin are the foods you should be imitating.
There could be a BWO hatch on warm days.

03/01/16 There is a week of good weather ahead with mild temperatures and less snow and
rain. The discharges have been low and the few anglers fishing have been catching trout. The
section just below the dam is best. Midges and Winter stoneflies are the insects to imitate.

03/08/16 The USGS gauge below Barrett is working again and the discharges and stream
levels are below normal for this time of the year. There is a lot of rain in the forecast this
coming week and that may eventually affect the discharges and levels, so be sure to check
them. Blood midge (red) and cream midges are the most important insects to imitate.

03/15/16 The weather is returning to a more normal pattern for this time of the year. The
discharges and stream levels are down, providing good conditions for fly fishing the tailwater.
Midges, both creams and the blood midges (red) are the main insects to be imitating. Fish the
pupa and larva in tandem for the best results.

03/22/16 The river is in good shape with low discharges and good stream levels. The water is
still very cold and the most opportunity comes from fishing midge larva and pupa in
combination or tandem. There have been a few trout taken from the surface. The Brown
sculpin streamer is a good fly to use early and late or with cloud cover.

03/29/16 The Beaverhead is in as good of shape as it could possibly be at this time of the
year. It is a good time to hook some big brown trout. The discharge level and stream level is
low, and the water getting just a little warmer on the middle and lower end of the river. The
Sculpin streamers will catch the larger size brown trout.

04/05/16 The Beaverhead continues to be one of the best early season fly fishing destinations.
The discharges and stream levels continue to be low and the brown trout are cooperating and
taking midge larvae and pupae imitations well. It is going to be nice and warm this coming week
with little chance of rain.

04/12/16 Right now, the discharge and stream levels are low. The water is clear and conditions
are excellent. There has been some rain and more rain and snow is expected, so be sure and
check the levels. We do expect them to increase at some point. Little Black Caddis should
begin to hatch soon.

04/19/16 The discharges and stream level is low right now but there is a lot of melting snow in
the headwaters and we think the lake will start being lowered soon. You will just have to keep a
close check on the discharges. Midges, Blue-winged olive and sculpin are still the main foods
you should be imitating. Little Black Caddis are hatching on the lower end of the tailwater.

04/26/16 The river is in good shape right now, but there will be a lot of extra water coming into
the lake to be discharged the next few days. They are showing chances of rain or snow every
day this coming week and the snow will mostly melt. Midges and little Blue-winged olives will
continue to be the main aquatic insects to imitate.

05/03/16 The river is in decent shape with mostly clear water. It is stained in places at times but
getting a little warmer on the middle and lower sections of the river. The Mother's Day Caddis
hatch, or Little Black Grannom caddis, should begin to hatch anytime in the lowest section of
the river. This will increase the dry fly action which now, consist only of midges and BWOs.

05/10/16 The Beaverhead is in as good of shape as any stream in Montana right now. The
stream levels are a little high but fine for drift boats. There is little rain in the forecast and
conditions likely will remain good for the coming week. Midges, little Blue-winded olives and little
Black Caddis in the lowest section will continue to hatch.

05/17/16 The tailwater is in very good condition and our customers are giving some good
report the last two days. Stream levels are down. There will be a lot of cloud cover this coming
week with chances of rain every day. That makes great conditions for fishing our White Belly
and Brown sculpin streamers and catching big browns.

05/24/16 The Beaverhead is currently providing one of the top destinations in Montana
because of the Spring Runoff. So far, the levels have remained low due to low discharges. Our
customers reported catching some nice brown trout this past week on Blue-winged olives.
There is a chance of rain every day for the next week. The cloud cover helps the hatches.

05/31/16 The Beaverhead is in great shape with good flows. It is one of the few good options
for fly fishing at this time in the state of Montana. Keep in mind, the warmer weather this week is
going to kick off more runoff and at some point the discharges are likely to increase. All you
can do is keep a close look at the levels.

06/07/16  The discharges are currently high and resulting stream levels too high for most small
drift boats. You will just have to watch the levels. There is a lot of rain in the forecast and the
runoff is still under way. It will be a few more days before everything settles down.

06/14/16 It may appear that the runoff is over, but we don't think so. The levels are down from
last week and the river can be fished by drift boat at this time, but it is still high and the water
stained. Streamers may get you some browns. The weather is going to be much cooler. Let's
just hope the runoff does end a little early this year.  

06/20/16 Discharges at the dam and the resulting stream level is down a lot from the past week
and the river getting into good shape. The water is mostly clear and getting warmer. Some
hatches are taking place, mostly little Blue-winged Olives in the mayfly category, and Spotted
and Green Sedges, in the caddisfly category.

06/28/16 The levels are still in decent shape from drift boat fishing. The discharges should stay
low most of the time. The lake level is down and that shouldn't control the discharges as it has
been doing. There are lots of caddisflies, including three species but most of them are Spotted
Sedges. They provide late afternoon dry fly action for those that stay late.

07/05/16 The river is running a little high right now, above normal flows but still can be fished. It
just makes it a little more difficult. Sometimes streamers give you the best opportunity on higher
flows, especially for the larger brown trout. There are several insects hatching. We don't expect
the high flows to continue for very long. You will just have to check the levels and schedule.

07/12/16 Currently, there are strong, fast currents from relatively high discharges. The river
can be fished from a drift boat but would be much better when the level drops. Streamers are
the best option now. You will just have to keep checking the levels to know when a good time to
fish is.

07/19/16 Pale Morning duns have begin to hatch in good numbers. There are still a few BWOs
hatching as well. Lots of caddisflies are hatching including three different species, Few stay
late in the day to fish, but right now, that is the best time of the day. There is a lot of egg laying
caddis on the water to near dark.

07/26/16 The high discharges and water levels are making it difficult to fish, even from a larger
drift boat. You can fish streamers and nymph rigs under indicators. It is just making it less
productive than it would be with good flows. You will just have to keep checking the release
schedule and levels. This is normal at this time of the season.

08/02/16 We received a good report from customers fishing this past week. They caught
several large browns on our Brown Sculpin streamers. The stream levels and discharges are
down some and that is making it a little easier on the drift boats. The weather is still hot and
Pale Morning duns, Tricos and caddisflies are still the main insects hatching.

08/09/16 Remember there are two species of insects called Pale Morning duns, and the
smaller of the two is hatching now. There are still plenty of caddisflies. They hatch mid
afternoons and deposit their eggs the last three hours of the day. This is a good destination
with the Hoot Owl restrictions in place on most freestone streams.

08/16/16 The beaverhead is one of the top destinations in the state now that many streams are
under Hoot Owl restrictions. The cool tailwaters keep the fish active all summer. The stream
levels have been good for drift boat fishing the past week. There are a lot of caddisflies
hatching. Terrestrials fished under the many overhanging trees is working good as well.

08/23/16 The discharges and resulting stream levels are in good shape for fly fishing the
Beaverhead. The weather is turning a little cooler with little chance of rain this coming week.
Terrestrials like Japanese Beetles, Carpenter ants and grass hoppers are working good. There
are still some hatches taking place, mostly caddisflies.

08/30/16 There is a little rain in the forecast which helps from a cloudy sky situation. Stream
levels and discharges have been good for drift boat fishing and this should continue through
the coming week. Early morning streamer fishing is excellent. Late afternoon egg laying
caddisflies is another prime time to catch trout and on the dry fly. Tricos are hatching good and
terrestrials working.

09/06/16 The discharges and resulting stream levels are low and continue to provide anglers
some good opportunities. Many anglers are using terrestrials only, mostly grass hoppers. It can
be overdone. It works good much of the time but other things like early morning streamer
fishing will produce better results. Late afternoon egg laying caddis continue to bring a lot of
trout to the surface to feed.

09/13/16 The river continues to be one of the best options for those fishing from drift boats.
The discharges have been a little lower giving good levels. Terrestrials fished along the banks
have been producing some good action. Our Sculpin streamers have continues to work good
and produce some of the larger browns caught. There are still some good caddisfly and BWO
hatches taking place.

09/20/16 The stream levels are down a little below normal but it is raining now and will continue
through Saturday. They will probably change at some point and run more water. For now,
fishing terrestrials along the banks under the bushes and trees is producing some nice trout.
The cloud cover helps a lot as well. There are Mahogany duns hatching.  

09/27/16 The discharges and resulting stream levels for the Beaverhead are low. Anglers can
wade in the lower section of the river and the drift boat guys have enough current to keep them
pounding the banks with hoppers, beetles and ants. There are some good BWO hatches
taking place and lots of Mahogany duns. Conditions are about as good as they get at this time
of the year.

10/04/16 The river is in good shape with good discharges and good stream levels in all
sections. The brown trout have become very aggressive and entering the full blown pre-spawn
mode. They are taking the Brown Sculpin streamers and Black Matuka streamers very well.
There is some rain and snow forecast through Saturday.

10/11/16 The discharges and stream levels are low right now. You can actually wade some
sections of the river. That will soon change as there is a lot of rain in the forecast this coming
week. Our customers have been catching a lot of trout including some big browns. Most of
them came on the Sculpin streamers patterns but fish are also being taken on the surface on
BWO hatches.

10/18/16 here is a lot more brown trout being caught. They are in the pre-spawn stage or
actual spawning in some cases. The discharges and stream levels are still a little low but that
makes it possible to wade some of the lower sections. Our customers are catching lots of trout
both rainbows and browns. Blue-winged olive hatches are good. Now, is a great time to be
fishing the Beaverhead.

10/25/16 The river is in good shape with lots of trout being caught. Blue-winged olives are
hatching good and those who are chasing the big brown trout are scoring well on streamers,
especially our Brown and White Belly sculpin. Discharges are good and the weather has some
chances of rain this coming week. Cloudy skies will help.

11/01/16 The discharges and stream levels continue to be low. Some sections are very low but
there is still plenty of water for drift boats. They have some time to make some good
presentations. Blue-winged olives are hatching good. Sculpin streamers, both the Brown and
Matuka styles, are still catching some big brown trout for our customers.

11/08/16 We had two customers drifting the river recently. They managed to catch some very
large post-spawn brown trout and good numbers of rainbows. Blue-winged olives are hatching
good. The discharges and stream levels are averaging a good level recently and should stay
down low for this coming week. It is a great time to fish the river with good weather and stream
conditions.

11/15/16 The weather is going to turn much colder and more normal for this time of the year.
This will affect the fishing and water temperature very little and then only in the middle and
lower sections of the river. Midges will be the most important food for the next few months but
there will be hatching of Blue-winged olives and other insects to some degree. Sculpin
streamers will continue to be effective.

11/22/16 The weather and water temperature is much colder. The water temperature is in the
low forties, even near the dam. Midges are catching the most trout. Creams and reds, or blood
midges, are most plentiful. There are some little Blue-winged olives hatching. The Sculpin
streamers are still catchng the larger trout. It is a good time to fish the river. There is little
competition.