"Perfect Fly" Tan Marabou Shrimp (Tan, Yellow, White and Coral)
This fly imitates shrimp that are found on the saltwater flats and  
the shallow water of the backcountry and estuaries. It's an excellent
bonefish fly as well as a permit fly. Other species the fly works great on are
redfish, ladyfish, stripped bass, pompano, flounder, fluke, speckled trout,
sea trout and just about any other inshore saltwater gamefish that eat
shrimp. The fly comes in four colors: Yellow, white, coral and tan. We like to
use the coral and tan colors in ultra clear water. The Yellow is especially
good in backcountry waters, brackish water and flats with some color due
to wind and heavy sea action. The white will work well in any color of water,
clear or stained. The fly rides with the hook turned up and works well on
most any type of bottom, sand, rock, and in weedy areas. They are tied on
super sharp, stainless steel hooks. These flies cast well with their slightly
weighted dumbell eyes. They come in a hook size 6, which is about 2 and
one-half inches long. We suggest a nine-weight, fast to medium fast action
fly rod. Oh yes, it does have a sharp stainless steel hook. It is just well
hidden.
Copyright 2013 James Marsh
Fishing Journal
November 2013 Issue
T
he Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) finally did something that's was not only the right thing to
do, but something that will go down in the history of the state's highly controversial regulations as a good thing. They
unanimously approved new regulations that make tarpon and bonefish "catch-and-release-only" fisheries.
    Since the start of my syndicated TV saltwater fishing series in 1980, the nations first ever TV series featuring saltwater
fishing, I have had a difficult time agreeing with many things the state has done affecting recreational fishing. In the 1980's, I
witnessed the decline of king mackerel, snook and many other species become near extinction due to commercial over-harvesting.
From then until fairly recently, regulations have varied from either seriously overdone, to seriously underdone. Just recently, along
with every charter boat operation on the Gulf, I've observed ridiculous recreational limits placed on red snapper. Not that anyone
probably cares but me, but having spent over thirty years condemning many of Florida's regulations, it seems only right that I
should compliment a very good regulation. The Bonefish and Tarpon Trust was certainly pleased with the decision that not only
protects tarpon in Florida waters but extends the catch and release regulations into the federal waters off of the state of Florida.

The new regulations include eliminating all harvest of tarpon with the exception of the harvest or possession of a single tarpon
when in pursuit of an IGFA record and in conjunction with a tarpon tag. It keeps the tarpon tag price at fifty bucks per tag but limits
them to one tage per person, per year. It makes other tarpon tag program changes, including reporting requirements. It requires
that tarpon remain in the water and that they are released near the site of their capture.

The new regulations discontinues the bonefish tournament exemption permit that allows tournament anglers to temporarily posses
bonefish for transportation to a tournament scale. That makes the regulations the same as those of the National Parks in Florida.
Conservation
Florida's New Tarpon and Bonefish Regulations
A Very Good Thing

by James Marsh
Angie Marsh /  
Tuskasegee River,
North Carolina
A Couple of our Best Selling "Perfect Fly" Flat Flies
"Perfect Fly" Mantis Shrimp (Olive, Brown and Tan)
This fly imitates Mantis shrimp that are found on the saltwater flats and
estuaries. Mantis shrimp are actually not shrimp. They get their name from
the similar terrestrial praying mantis and shrimp. They are eaten by many
species of gamefish. It is an excellent permit fly as well as a bonefish fly.
Other species the fly works great on are the redfish, ladyfish, stripped
bass, pompano, flounder, fluke, speckled trout, sea trout and just about
any inshore saltwater gamefish that eats shrimp. The Mantis Shrimp fly
comes in three colors - olive, brown and tan. We like to use the olive and
brown colors in clear water. The tan is especially good in backcountry
waters, brackish water and flats with some color due to wind and heavy
sea action. This fly rides with the hook turned up and it has a mono week
guard. This allows you to fish it in water with weed beds and other
obstructions that would hang most flies. Like all of our saltwater flies,
these are tied using super sharp, stainless steel hooks. These flies cast
well with their slightly weighted eyes. They come in a hook size 4, which
is about 2 and one-half inches long, and the size of the real mantis shrimp.
We suggest a nine-weight, fast to medium fast action fly rod.