Fly Line Tapers:   

Casting a tapered line is much easier than casting a level line and for that reason, we
only recommend that your use tapered fly lines.

All fly lines, except the level line, are tapered. The distribution of weight varies in a
tapered line. Generally, tapered lines gradually decrease in weight near the leader end.
This helps you present flies in a smoother, quieter manner and more accurately. The
overall length of the standard fly line is usually seventy five to ninety five feet.

Most tapered lines begin with a thin portion at the leader end and gradually increases in
thickness to form what anglers call the “belly” of the line. The belly is usually about thirty
feet long and for the most part, at least, is the portion of the line that you cast. The rest
of the line is called the “running” line. These types of lines are called weight-forward
lines.    

There are also double-tapered lines that taper down on both ends of the line. From the
middle of the line to either end the line is tapered the same. Double tapered lines can be
reversed to use either end. This may offer an advantage in that the line may be used for
a longer period of time.

A shooting-tapered line, sometimes called a shooting head, has about thirty feet of head
on the end of a very small floating line. Shooting-tapered lines can be used when
exceptionally long cast are required or in heavy winds. For most fishing situations and
again, especially for the beginner, we recommend the weight-forward line.

Also, there are multi-tip fly lines that eliminate the need for carrying extra spools and
lines. Multi-tip lines come with different tip sections usually about twelve feet in length.
Factory-welded loops lets you easily change multi-tips without interfering with line guides
by creating a hinge-free casting connection.

Multi-tip lines usually come with floating, intermediate, fast sinking and super fast sinking
sections. They come in handy when you want a different taper and want it without having
to re-line your fly reel or choose a different fly reel.

Keep in mind, the taper of the fly line is a huge factor in the way any fly rod cast. It affects
the casting distance, accuracy and ease of casting.
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