Tobyhanna Creek Pennsylvania
Tobyhanna Creek
Copyright 2016 James Marsh
Fly Fishing Tobyhanna Creek
Pennsylvania
Tobyhanna Creek is a Pocono Mountains trout stream
that flows from Tobyhanna Lake. It is fairly large,
averaging about forty to sixty feet wide. Much of the
stream runs through state game lands. Above I-380, the
stream consist mostly of pocket water. The elevation of
the creek is fairly high in that location. it is high enough
that Tobyhanna Lake freezes over in the Winter. The
stream flows for about seven miles through State Game
Land # 127 and under I-380.

There is a "Delayed Harvest - Artificial Lures Only"
section, that's one mile long that extends from the
confluence of Still Swamp Run, downstream to the
Pennsylvania Power service bridge. This area receives
a fall stocking of trout. It requires a hike to get to this
area of water.

The middle section of Tobyhanna can be accessed
rather easily. Route 423 parallels the stream. On the
east side of I-380, State Game Land #127 has several  
parking areas and a foot trail leads down to the stream. .


Tobyhanna Creek Fly Fishing Guide:
Fly fishing Tobyhanna Creek in the stocked Delayed
Harvest Area is one thing and catching the stream's wild
trout is another. Stocked trout are far less selective than
stream born or holdover trout. You can get by with
generic and non-specific imitations. Although catching
trout on the dry fly is a lot of fun, you will probably do
much better fishing nymphs. Strike indicators work fine
in the stocked areas.

Even though the upper part of Tobyhanna Creek consist
mostly of pocket water, the stream has lots of slow
moving water and large pools in its middle and lower
ends. Much of the stream flows very slow. The trout
have ample time to examine your fly as well as they want
to. This results is tough challenges at times.

Another problem with the stream is tannic acid. It is tea
colored water. Don't let this fool you though. When you
fill a glass with its water and look at it in the light, it
appears to be very clear. It affects the way the trout see
your fly much less than you think.

It the upper part of the stream pocket water, we
recommend that you fish the stream in an upstream
direction using up and up and across presentations.
Fish the current seams and lines of bubbles down the
runs and riffles. When you are fishing the smooth water
in the lower section of the stream, fish in a downstream
direction making your presentations down and down and
across. When you fish downstream, you will need to
make longer cast and get the fly drifting drag free. Done
in an ideal manner, the trout will see the fly before they
can see the tippet and leader.

The DLH section can be accessed by taking a shorter
hike or a longer ones. Most anglers take the easiest
routes to the stream. Putting in some extra effort to
reach areas that are not heavily fished can be
rewarding.  
Type of Stream
Freestone

Species
Brown Trout (Wild)
Brook Trout (Wild)
and Stocked Trout

Size
Medium to Large

Location
Northeastern Pennsylvania

Nearest Towns
Tobyhanna
Scranton

Season
Year-round in the Delayed Harvest
Section

Access:
Fair

Non-Resident License
State of Pennsylvania

Weather
National Weather Service Link

Hatch Chart
Perfect Fly Hatch Chart

Fly Fishing Gear, Tackle and
Trout Flies
Tobyhanna Creek
Pennsylvania
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Photo Courtesy of
Dennis McCarthy
Photo Courtesy of
Dennis McCarthy
Seasons:
The season is year-round in the delayed
harvest area but regular season rules of
mid April through February applies
elsewhere.
Spring:
Springtime is the best time to fish
Tobyhanna Creek.
Summer:
The fishing slows down some during the
hottest part of summer but still can be good.
Tobyhanna Creek Hatches and
Trout Flies:
Our information on aquatic
insects is based on our stream samples of
larvae and nymphs, not guess work. We
base fly suggestions on imitating the most
plentiful and most available insects and
other foods at the particular time you are
fishing. Unlike the generic fly shop trout
flies, we have specific imitations of all the
insects in Tobyhanna Creek and in all
stages of life that are applicable to fishing.
If you want to fish better, more realistic
trout flies, have a much higher degree of
success, give us a call.  We not only will
help you with selections, you will learn why,
after trying Perfect Flies, 92% of the
thousands of our customers will use
nothing else.
1-800-594-4726.

The hatches are not huge or prolific on
Tobyhanna like they are in most of
Pennsylvania's Spring Creeks, but they do
have a fairly large diversity of aquatic
insects. When something does hatch, you
may find the trout keying in on the insects.

The first insects to hatch are the Little
Winter Stoneflies. Little Browns and Little
Blacks are common in the pocket water
sections of the stream. Blue-winged Olives
start hatching in late March and will hatch
off and on until October. There are several
species but none of them are huge
hatches.

Blue Quills normally start hatching near the
end of March. They are usually around for
about a month. In April and early May, you
may find a few March Browns in the faster
sections of water.

Caddisflies are present, but not real
abundant. The LIttle Black Caddis start
hatching in mid April and hatch for about
three weeks.
Hatches, continued:
By May, Green Sedges make their
appearance. These caddisflies can hatch
for as long as three months but never in
any large quantities.

Cinnamon Caddis are the most common
caddisflies. They are more plentiful on the
lower section of the stream. There is also
some Little Brown Caddis that hatch in the
slower sections of the water.

There is a Hendrickson hatch that occurs in
late April and early May but again, it usually
isn't prolific. You can catch trout eating the
emergers and the spinners late in the day
near dark. Slate Drakes are another
common mayfly but they never hatch in any
large quantities. They do hatch off and on
from June until near October. There are a
few Light Cahills that hatch in June but in a
very sparse manner.

Sculpin, baitfish and crayfish are present in
the creek and provide food for the trout.
Streamers that imitate these work well at
times. Terrestrial insects, mainly beetles,
grasshoppers and ants provide part of the
food for the trout. Imitations of them work
from late June until near the end of
September.

We recommend our own "Perfect Flies", not
just because we sell them but also because
they are the most realistic imitations of trout
food you can purchase. They are also the
most effective trout flies you can buy. They
work far better than the typical flies
especially in the slow water areas of the
stream where the trout get a good look at
your fly. We hope you will give them a try.
Fall:
As you can see in the pictures, Autumn is a
beautiful time to fish the stream.
Winter:
Fish can be caught during the winter and
can even be good on warm days.
Tobyhanna Creek Fly Fishing
Report:
Coming Soon
Tobyhanna Creek tributary stream
Tobyhanna Creek
Tobyhanna Creek
Tobyhanna Creek
Photos Courtesy of
Dennis McCarthy
Options For Selecting Flies:
1. Email us (sales@perfectflystore.com)
with the dates you will be fishing this
stream and we will send you a list of our
fly suggestions. Please allow up to 24
hours for a response.

2. Call us 800-594-4726 and we will help
you decide which flies you need.

3. Email us (sales@perfectflystore.com)
with a budget for flies and we will select
them to match the budget and get them to
you in time for your fly fishing trip.

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U. S. Orders over $50 are shipped via
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